“The Green House Project gave us a national platform to tell our story.”

Terry Rogers , CEO, St. Martin's in the Pines

National Media Items
If you haven’t yet heard of the Green House Project, chances are you will soon. Thanks to funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, there are already more than 170 Green House Project homes in 32 states, with more than 100 more in the works...21st-century Green House Project has been creating specially-designed homes in which elders can live with dignity, comfort and companionship.
Blog summarizes recent feature in The Atlantic that goes into Green House Project, Leonard Florence Center for Living, and demonstrates how long term care can be difference and better.
Susan Frazier, Senior Director of The Green House Project joins other innovators in the field to discuss how changing the way we view aging, and implementing programs to support meaningful lives can impact the world.
Maria is 105 years of age. In her bedroom, the centenarian sits comfortably in a high-back chair with a view of Boston Harbour. Within an arm’s reach is a remote control designed for her with large numbers to enhance independent TV watching. Next to her wall-mounted flatscreen TV is a chalk board with the activities of the week: hairdo every Tuesday, bingo at 2 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday, communion at 10 a.m. on Sundays, and the times and channels for her favourite TV shows.
Nobody gets excited at the idea of moving to a nursing home. The typical image most of us have of homes for elder care is cold and institutional. That hospital-like environment with long hallways, shared rooms, and seniors dependent on overworked nurses who can only give them a few minutes at a time – that doesn’t have to be the way it works.
The previous column detailed some of the difficulties and failings of traditional skilled nursing institutions and introduced the innovative approach of Bill Thomas’s Eden Alternative and its offshoot, the Green House homes. This column will give more details about the Green House Movement.
Bowers and Nolet previously studied how the Green House model’s unique staff structure affects nursing practice and Elders’ care. More recently, they and other UW–Madison colleagues looked at how Green House Homes maintain culture change practices over time. They also asked how different care practices affect Elders’ clinical outcomes.
"household models do not have to cost more than traditional operations. But to keep the bottom line stable — or even to boost profits — a provider must plan carefully, finance and build smartly, and commit not only to providing care in a new type of environment but in new ways."
“So the question at this point,” Alana Semuels of The Atlantic, writes, “isn’t so much what do good nursing homes look like, but how do you transform the existing institutions into places that look like them?” With one-third of the U.S. population likely to be over 65 by 2050, it’s a question that needs some consideration.
In “A Better Nursing Home Exists,” writer Alana Semuels explores the history of The Green House Project and Leonard Florence Center for Living, their unique ALS/MS residences, and CEO Barry Berman’s vision for his legacy nursing home. “This is not a nursing home with residential trappings,” Steve Saling, a resident living at LFCL with ALS, says. “It is my home that happens to provide skilled nursing services.”
Already 167 Green House homes in the United States have been built by 39 organizations, and 1,735 people are living in them in cheerful surroundings respectful of their needs and wants. Another 108 similar homes are now in development.
Green House Homes are a new model for caring for the elderly that makes sure they’re integrated into the community and puts their care first.
The Green House concept is the most comprehensive effort to reinvent the nursing home, experts say — including the way medical care is delivered.
The white paper “Financial Implications of THE GREEN HOUSE® Model” was announced by the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC) as the winner of the GE Award for Best Research Paper from its annual call for applied research papers. The article appeared in the 2011 Seniors Housing & Care Journal and analyzes several recent studies to determine the Green House model’s initial and long-term financial viability.
In 2011, Green House Project was named as one of the “Top Ten Senior Living Design Innovations”
Say goodbye to long corridors, central nursing stations and multiple roommates. In the Green House model, each of the 10 to 12 residents has a private bedroom and bathroom connected to a common dining room, an open country kitchen where all the meals are prepared, a living room, and an indoor porch or backyard.
A model that breaks the mold of institutional care by creating small homes for six to 10 ‘elders’ who require skilled nursing or assisted living care. The homes, which are designed for the purpose of offering ‘privacy, autonomy, support, enjoyment, and a place to call home,’ are a radical departure from traditional skilled nursing facilities and are considered to be the peak of culture change.
The success of the Green House model lies in trading a typical nursing home’s top-down organizational structure for a self-managed team of workers who share the tasks involved in caring for their residents, including housekeeping and cooking. Most important, Dr. Thomas says he wanted to create residences that avoided the loneliness and expense of at-home care and the coldness of an institution.
The foundation's undertaking represents the most ambitious effort to date to turn a nice idea into a serious challenger to the nation's system of 16,000 nursing homes.
At some point in life, you can't live on your own anymore. We don't like thinking about it, but after retirement age, about half of us eventually move into a nursing home, usually around age 80. It remains your most likely final address outside of a hospital. To the extent that there is much public discussion about this phase of life, it's about getting more control over our deaths (with living wills and the like). But we don't much talk about getting more control over our lives in such places. It's as if we've given up on the idea. And that's a problem.
The nursing home where Reinhard lives is known as a Green House, and it could be a model for the long-term-care institution of the future.
"At the center of the Green House is quality of life — meaning worth and dignity. At the Green House, we put those things at the center of life."
Local News Items
Clark-Lindsey in Urbana, IL, has partnered with The Green House Project and architecture firm Perkins Eastman to create small homes for specialized dementia care
In a Green House Project home, though, dementia care is designed to look and feel like it's being delivered in a real home, all the way down to the home-cooked meals. Urbana's Clark-Lindsey Village will be the third site in Illinois to add Green House Project homes, with two other Green House locations at VA health centers in Danville and Chicago.
Roughly 60 people attended the groundbreaking. Among these individuals were representatives from GH Phipps, the company building the nursing home; residents and staff from the nursing home; and members of the Washington County Nursing Home Board.
U.S. News & World Report awarded Buckner's two Green House homes with a four-star rating in its annual Best Nursing Homes issue.
“The Homeplace at Midway represents a new beginning for older adults in Kentucky and for communities across the commonwealth to embrace them as living treasures, not a burden or a challenge,” Dr. Keith Knapp, president and chief executive officer of Christian Care Communities, which built the Homeplace and will operate it, said at the ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Texas Dept of Aging and Disability Services highlight Fred Worley and his dedication to good design for Elders and their community. Check out this great article highlighting his career and the Green House Homes he designed at Buckner Senior Living Baptist Memorials in San Angelo, Texas!
“the Green House model provides a natural environment that promotes a meaningful experience with elderhood and the later stages of life. The Green House model is a de-institutionalization effort that restores individuals to a home in the community with the full range of personal care and clinical services expected in high-quality nursing homes.”
, Episcopal Homes of Minnesota has opened the doors of The Gardens, Minnesota’s first nursing home designed around the Green House Model of Care.
The Gardens is the state’s first nursing home to implement the innovative Green House model of skilled nursing care. A Green House home is created to foster the same feeling and experience as living in a real home.
Dubbed “Cottages of Lake St. Louis,” the community will be comprised of six homes, each of which will house 10 residents. Each will be about 7,149 square feet, for a total of 42,894 square feet.
Construction was completed for The Woodlands at John Knox Village and the milestone was celebrated by residents and staff at an April 28 topping-off ceremony—complete with the traditional placing of a tree on top of the structure.
How the Green House model transformed one woman’s life and an overview of how the Green House Project has grown, its model and why its unique, also noting the recognition it received in the “Homes on the Range” film.
The article reports that the Ave Maria Home is tied for first-place health care facility, which is a member of the national Green House Project.
Profiles the work of Noel Auld, an employee of Jewish Home Lifecare, which is partnering with the Green House Project to build The Living Center of Manhattan.
Opportunities for people to hear from experts on aging, including an upcoming presentation by Bill Thomas “ChangingAging: Challenging Conventional Views on Aging.”
An article reports on the new Green House home that will be built in Janesville, Minnesota, and comments on how the new home will impact local residents
An article dedicated to Dr. Bill Thomas chronicles his journey leading up to the inception of Green House, shares his philosophy on aging and positions him as a leader and innovator in the industry.
An opinion article argues for a change in nursing home structure in Chesire County, naming Green House as a successful model that should be implemented.
In his coverage of the Audobon Christmas Bird Count, the author mentions that a bird path was installed behind Green House homes for residents to use
The author describes how he met Dr. Bill Thomas and why Cheshire County should adopt the Green House model to better care for their elderly.
The author provides an overview of the GHP model and how it can improve elder care: “On the other hand, the Green House concept, which started more than a decade ago and now has facilities in 30 states, is transforming the culture of long-term care.”
Details on the opening of a Midway Nursing Home which is based off the Green House Model to create a home-like environment
WRVO Public Media’s recent community forum on the topic of aging, referencing panelist Dr. Bill Thomas’ input, who is described as an “innovator in senior housing.”
The Paralyzed Veterans of America’s experience with GHP and the growing support of its innovative model: “The Department of Veterans Affairs and nursing homes across the country are beginning to embrace the Green House model of care that focuses on the dignity, health and independence of patients as well as the well-being of medical staff and caregivers."
Coverage of the premiere viewing of “Homes on the Range” in Sheridan, a documentary detailing the planning and building of Green House Living homes for elders in Sheridan.
Report on the approved plans for a Green House nursing home in Ozark as “part of the nationwide move designed to make nursing homes less institutional.”
Report on the opening of the second of six Loveland Green House Homes, describing the model and the improvements it makes for residents.
Announcement of Dr. Bill Thomas’ upcoming speaking engagement at the UNR's Division of Health Sciences and details some of his successes.
Review of the documentary “Alive Inside” including quotes from those who attended a Modesto screening and Dr. Bill Thomas on the positive impact music has on nursing home residents.
In his review of Gawande’s book, the author mentions the section on “nursing home pioneer” Bill Thomas and the improvements he made to a New York nursing home.
In 2012, VA Illiana received national recognition for their planning and implementation of the Green House model through a federal award by the Under Secretary of Health for Innovation in Long Term Care.
Buffalo News reprints the New York Times article spotlighting Green House.
Spotlights the Loveland, Colorado, Green House home, highlighting the positive features of the homes and sharing insight into what makes Green House a different, innovative model.